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Global Marketing

Important international business organizations and their influences–Part I

Globalization brought great opportunities to developing countries and businesses. Among the infrastructure of globalization, International business organizations played a very important role in the process of globalization and the communication between businesses. Moreover, these organizations have also become essential tools for dealing conflicts and developments between their members. As an international marketer, understand these IBOs’ functions and terms is necessary. We are going to introduce some IBOs and logic behind them briefly.

WTO (World Trade Organization)

The World Trade Organization (WTO) is an intergovernmental organization that regulates international trade. The WTO officially commenced on 1 January 1995 under the Marrakesh Agreement, signed by 123 nations on 15 April 1994, replacing the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT), which commenced in 1948. It is the largest international economic organization in the world. The WTO deals with regulation of trade in goods, services, and intellectual property between participating countries by providing a framework for negotiating trade agreements and a dispute resolution process aimed at enforcing participants' adherence to WTO agreements, which are signed by representatives of member governments and ratified by their parliaments. Most of the issues that the WTO focuses on derive from previous trade negotiations, especially from the Uruguay Round (1986–1994).

IMF (International Monetary Fund)

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) is an international organization headquartered in Washington, D.C., of “189 countries working to foster global monetary cooperation, secure financial stability, facilitate international trade, promote high employment and sustainable economic growth, and reduce poverty around the world.” Formed in 1945 at the Bretton Woods Conference primarily by the ideas of Harry Dexter White and John Maynard Keynes, it came into formal existence in 1945 with 29 member countries and the goal of reconstructing the international payment system. It now plays a central role in the management of balance of payments difficulties and international financial crises.  Countries contribute funds to a pool through a quota system from which countries are experiencing balance of payments problems can borrow money. As of 2016, the fund had SDR477 billion (about $668 billion).

Through the fund, and other activities such as the gathering of statistics and analysis, surveillance of its members' economies and the demand for particular policies, the IMF works to improve the economies of its member countries. The organization's objectives stated in the Articles of Agreement are: to promote international monetary co-operation, international trade, high employment, exchange-rate stability, sustainable economic growth, and making resources available to member countries in financial difficulty.

OPEC (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries)

The Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) is an intergovernmental organization of 14 nations as of February 2018, founded in 1960 in Baghdad by the first five members (Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, and Venezuela), and headquartered since 1965 in Vienna, Austria. As of 2016, the 14 countries accounted for an estimated 44 percent of global oil production and 73 percent of the world's “proven” oil reserves, giving OPEC a major influence on global oil prices that were previously determined by American -dominated multinational oil companies.

G-20 (The group of twenty)

The G20 (or G-20 or Group of Twenty) is an international forum for the governments and central bank governors from Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, the Republic of Korea, the Russian Federation, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Turkey, the United Kingdom, the United States, and the European Union, (plus Spain as a permanent guest member). Founded in 1999, the G20 aims to discuss policy pertaining to the promotion of international financial stability. It seeks to address issues that go beyond the responsibilities of any one organization. The G20 heads of government or heads of state have periodically conferred at summits since their initial meeting in 2008, and the group also hosts separate meetings of finance ministers and foreign ministers due to the expansion of its agenda in recent years.

Membership of the G20 consists of 19 individual countries plus the European Union (EU). The EU is represented by the European Commission and by the European Central Bank. Collectively, the G20 economies account for around 85% of the gross world product (GWP), 80% of world trade (or, if excluding EU intra-trade, 75%), two-thirds of the world population, and approximately half of the world land area.

Overall, as an international business manager, we should notice that different organizations actually represent different interests and associated parties. There is some obvious one side benefiting settings, moreover, combined with frequently changing relationships within IBOs. To corporations that who involved in the international market, be familiar with rules and backgrounds of IBOs will help them keep their advantage in the market, also have good resources to help them perform better in the market.

 

(All introduction of IBOs are from Public resources)