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Global Marketing

7-Eleven Glocalization

7-Eleven is a staple in the everyday life for some. A convenience store can supply beers, food, stationery for some in the U.S. but it is unlikely that a patron would really enjoy the hot dog. In Japan, we see a huge difference in how 7-Eleven approaches satisfying customers. The food ranges from corn dogs to sushi and ramen. From beer to 50 dollar whisky. Glocalization is when a company thinks global, but acts locally. 7-Eleven is an example of a company that does a good job of executing this. One example of how 7-Eleven is able to adapt to the locations is its execution of Japanese stores. Convenience stores (or konbini) in Japan are very different from those in the US. 7-Eleven boasts the highest number of stores in Japan. Its private label, Seven Premium, is known for its rich variety of products and high quality that is even comparable to specialty stores. Japanese konbini are open 24 hours and have everything you could want such as prepared food, drinks, alcohol, and living essentials. Not only that they have many services such as copy machines, ticket reservations, and postal services. The perception of 7-Elevens in Japan is very positive. Taking the U.S version of 7-Eleven and putting it into Japanese culture the way it was would have been far less successful.

2 replies on “7-Eleven Glocalization”

Very interesting article. I never would have thought that 7-Eleven was so popular in an international market, such as Japan, since here in the US its viewed as a limited convenience market that you only go to when get gas, essentially. Great piece, thank you!

Personally speaking, I used to work as a salesperson for a supplier of 7-11 across North America. 7-11 franchisees are given the ability to determine what suppliers they would like to use locally. For example, if they know a specific product sells more in their store and region, they have the ability to adapt their product offerings. Giving control to franchisees allows each store to take on local approach.

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